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"When you’re in high school, everyone is more apt to take part in ridicule and I got made fun of a lot for my breasts."
AMYNew York, NY 
Where are you from?I’m from Connecticut. I was raised there—we never moved.
Do you still live there?No, my mom’s side of the family is all still there, they have a family business there. I went to the same high school as my grandparents. It’s very nice to go home but it’s very, uh…hard to do anything. You get spotted because people recognize me as my mother’s daughter and I’m always like, “who’s that!”
What was your experience like in high school?Overall it’s wonderful the way I was raised. I got to see my great grandparents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins all the time. But in high school it was hard to date guys because it took no time for the information to spread around.
I also developed really early and was fuller busted than I would have liked. I was the girl in middle school with big boobs.
How early did you develop?Well, I got my first training bra when I was 10. It was this white, tiny, little triangle thing.Then when I was 12, I got my first real bra and it was a 32D. It was a soft blue color with an alpaca on the straps. It was beautiful and I thought it was made just for me. I just loved it.
Did you have difficulty playing sports in high school?I played softball in middle school and I was big into volleyball in high school. I didn’t let my breasts stop me—I would just wear several of them at a time. I wanted to be flat so when I dove into the net they wouldn’t get in the way.
I also wanted to be flat because at 16, when you’re bouncing around and you have boobs, you’re in a very vulnerable position. Now I could care less, but at that age it was an experience.
So what changed?There are a few things that made a difference. When you’re in high school everyone is more apt to take part in ridicule and I got made fun of a lot for my breasts. Now that I’m an adult, people are more open to actually giving compliments. This one girl that I thought was really pretty and super skinny told me how much she wished she had my breasts. She said “oh Amy, you look gorgeous! I love your boobs in that dress!” That comment really stuck out to me.
When I was younger, there was also not as much available to me in regards to bras. That pretty blue bra was hard to replace. Now that I’m older and actually work in the industry, beautiful lingerie is readily available to me.
Did you always want to be a lingerie designer?Well, I always expressed myself through clothes. I would experiment with different looks and my style was all over the place when I was young but now it’s definitely bohemian. The decision to go to design school was a natural one and then my curiosity and obsession with lingerie made my decision clear.
Is your personal lingerie style bohemian too?Well, I like things that are more traditional sexy. I like things with feminine components and beautiful lace. I like balconettes and semi-demi cups. I always wear pretty bottoms too but I don’t worry about them matching. It’s like I can have a party in my pants!
I also don’t ever worry about the size of my bra or bottoms. I try it on and think oh yeah! I enjoy this. It’s pretty. I don’t care if it’s a size larger or smaller than what I am used to, it matters more to me what I feel like in it. Some women I help freak out about labels and I think, well, if you’re comfortable in something that’s too small then go for it.
What does lingerie mean to you?Oh! I get excited to put new underwear on or colorful ones on. Like if it’s raining outside or I’m going to a function that I have to wear something blah then I can wear crazy polka-dots or strips. It doesn’t have to match the outfit—it can be whatever you want. If there’s a lining to your skirt, you can wear thigh highs and feel super sexy. There are no limits.
What’s your favorite body part?Oh, I love my collar bones. I love wearing clothes that show them off.
What’s your favorite quality?I’m driven. Sometimes that’s good and sometimes that’s hard, but it gets me where I’m going.





 

 

"When you’re in high school, everyone is more apt to take part in ridicule and I got made fun of a lot for my breasts."

AMY
New York, NY

Where are you from?
I’m from Connecticut. I was raised there—we never moved.

Do you still live there?
No, my mom’s side of the family is all still there, they have a family business there. I went to the same high school as my grandparents. It’s very nice to go home but it’s very, uh…hard to do anything. You get spotted because people recognize me as my mother’s daughter and I’m always like, “who’s that!”

What was your experience like in high school?
Overall it’s wonderful the way I was raised. I got to see my great grandparents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins all the time. But in high school it was hard to date guys because it took no time for the information to spread around.

I also developed really early and was fuller busted than I would have liked. I was the girl in middle school with big boobs.

How early did you develop?
Well, I got my first training bra when I was 10. It was this white, tiny, little triangle thing.Then when I was 12, I got my first real bra and it was a 32D. It was a soft blue color with an alpaca on the straps. It was beautiful and I thought it was made just for me. I just loved it.

Did you have difficulty playing sports in high school?
I played softball in middle school and I was big into volleyball in high school. I didn’t let my breasts stop me—I would just wear several of them at a time. I wanted to be flat so when I dove into the net they wouldn’t get in the way.

I also wanted to be flat because at 16, when you’re bouncing around and you have boobs, you’re in a very vulnerable position. Now I could care less, but at that age it was an experience.

So what changed?
There are a few things that made a difference. When you’re in high school everyone is more apt to take part in ridicule and I got made fun of a lot for my breasts. Now that I’m an adult, people are more open to actually giving compliments. This one girl that I thought was really pretty and super skinny told me how much she wished she had my breasts. She said “oh Amy, you look gorgeous! I love your boobs in that dress!” That comment really stuck out to me.

When I was younger, there was also not as much available to me in regards to bras. That pretty blue bra was hard to replace. Now that I’m older and actually work in the industry, beautiful lingerie is readily available to me.

Did you always want to be a lingerie designer?
Well, I always expressed myself through clothes. I would experiment with different looks and my style was all over the place when I was young but now it’s definitely bohemian. The decision to go to design school was a natural one and then my curiosity and obsession with lingerie made my decision clear.

Is your personal lingerie style bohemian too?
Well, I like things that are more traditional sexy. I like things with feminine components and beautiful lace. I like balconettes and semi-demi cups. I always wear pretty bottoms too but I don’t worry about them matching. It’s like I can have a party in my pants!

I also don’t ever worry about the size of my bra or bottoms. I try it on and think oh yeah! I enjoy this. It’s pretty. I don’t care if it’s a size larger or smaller than what I am used to, it matters more to me what I feel like in it. Some women I help freak out about labels and I think, well, if you’re comfortable in something that’s too small then go for it.

What does lingerie mean to you?
Oh! I get excited to put new underwear on or colorful ones on. Like if it’s raining outside or I’m going to a function that I have to wear something blah then I can wear crazy polka-dots or strips. It doesn’t have to match the outfit—it can be whatever you want. If there’s a lining to your skirt, you can wear thigh highs and feel super sexy. There are no limits.

What’s your favorite body part?
Oh, I love my collar bones. I love wearing clothes that show them off.

What’s your favorite quality?
I’m driven. Sometimes that’s good and sometimes that’s hard, but it gets me where I’m going.